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Thursday Scratch Nights

The Future City Debate

A Low Carbon Liveable City

3.7.2014
View of Campbell Park near MK Gallery

View of Campbell Park near MK Gallery

View of Campbell Park near MK Gallery

 

The Future City Debate: A Low Carbon Liveable City

Presented by the Fred Roche Foundation

Thursday 3 July / 7pm / Doors 6.30pm / Free

Pre-booking essential via Eventbrite

 

Building on the success of last December’s talks that accompanied the

Future City exhibition, MK Gallery collaborates with The Fred Roche Foundation to host several more in the coming months, aiming to stimulate creative discussion and debate around subjects that are vital to the growth and vitality of Milton Keynes

 

This talk will focus on ensuring Milton Keynes maintains a well-designed built and natural environment that will work in the future, and an environment that encapsulates sustainable landscapes and townscapes as well as a productive green resource.


Speakers: 

  • Dr Liz Varga, Director of Complex Systems Research Centre, Cranfield University
  • Rachel Cooper. OBE. Professor of Design Management at the University of Lancaster, Director of Imagination Lancaster. Co-investigator of Liveable Cities. Non-Executive Director of Future Cities Catapult. 
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    Guest Chair:
    John Walker, Chair, National Energy Foundation 

     

    Find out more

     

     

     

     

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    The Fred Roche Foundation celebrates the life of Fred Roche (1931-1992), who led the team in the 1970s who built the new city of Milton Keynes.  The Foundation endeavors to keep his spirit of creative exploration, innovation and vision alive in Milton Keynes.  

     

    He believed in the power – or rather the duty – of architecture to improve society.  If Milton Keynes is one person’s creation, it was Fred Roche’s”.  (Stephen Bayley, The Guardian)