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Talks & Workshops

MK Futures 2050 Moving Forward

19.5.2017

Future City Talk: MK Futures 2050 Moving Forward

Presented by the Fred Roche Foundation

Friday 19 May / 2pm / Free

 

Book tickets

 

In July 2016, the Milton Keynes Futures 2050 Commission published Milton Keynes: Making a Great City Greater, its independent report about the future of Milton Keynes and presented six big projects. Since then Milton Keynes Council have adopted the report’s recommendations. These are now being taken forward as part of MKC’s MK Futures 2050 Programme. 

 

This event will focus on the progress being made with the six big projects, including the Strategy for 2050, the new university, the mobility strategy, CMK and the cultural offer. 

 

A number of speakers will be joining us to help with the progress update including Geoff Snelson Director of Strategy and Futures MKC, Professor Lynette Ryals Pro-Vice Chancellor Education. Cranfield University, Brian Matthews Head of Transport Innovation MKC, Chris Murray Director of Core Cities UK and Pete Winkelman Chairman of MK Dons and MD of Inter MK; both Chris and Pete were commissioners instrumental in the ‘Milton Keynes: Making a Great City Greater’ report.

 

The event will include a number of open discussion sessions to allow some of the project ideas to be examined.                                                                                                                     

 

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The Fred Roche Foundation celebrates the life of Fred Roche (1931-1992), who led the team in the 1970s who built the new city of Milton Keynes.  The Foundation endeavors to keep his spirit of creative exploration, innovation and vision alive in Milton Keynes.  

 

He believed in the power – or rather the duty – of architecture to improve society.  If Milton Keynes is one person’s creation, it was Fred Roche’s”.  (Stephen Bayley, The Guardian)